Thursday, 19 June 2014

It seems being disabled means you have no friends

Firstly, i shall start with

I HAVE MOTHER FLIPPING JOHN LEGEND TICKETS!!!


This for me is a blumming big deal. I have loved Mr Legend since i first heard Used to love U 10 years ago. I have all his albums, even some live ones, but i have never seen him live, not for trying.

I have tried 3 times, once i couldn't get tickets, the second time i was in hospital and the third time it was my best friends 21st, and i couldn't miss that.

But amongst all the excitement i am a little annoyed.

It seems being disabled means you have no friends.

After phoning 3 different numbers to get through to the person that deals with accessible tickets, over two days, because online it says to phone between 2.30pm and 7pm, where in fact the person leaves at 3pm, i thought booking 4 tickets would be fine.

Easy yeah, but massively annoying.

The seats for wheelchair uses, row D, carers ticket row C, friends ticket Row L.

Now don't get me wrong, i'm going to see my favourite artist and enjoy the music, but part of that enjoyment comes from enjoying the moment with friends.

But no, i am technically, really sat by myself.

It's so annoying, as a wheelchair user you find yourself isolated from so many situations, mostly due to access, often due to care issues, and on occasion anxiety.

I was so excited to see that  not only was John Legend coming to the UK, but that it was at a venue that had really good access, and somewhere i would feel comfortable (i have crazy crazy vertigo), because of this i knew id be able to properly enjoy myself, with my friends, and just feel like myself, not different, especially after my last concert experience.

2 years ago i went to the MEN, firstly accessible seating is ridiculously high, and here you are left completely alone, friends and family are 5 rows in front, blocked by metal bars, and they get told off for standing with you because of health and safety, it's not a fun, and it takes away so much from what should be an amazing
experience.

So to find that i'd be once again by myself i just felt a little like 'for feck sake, just give me a damn break'.

Regardless of all these annoyances, i am massively excited, but disabled people do have friends, and do infact want to experience things with them, so maybe allocate tickets that are together.

7 comments:

  1. That does seem like a really silly system :( I'm glad you're going but sad that you don't get to be with your friends.

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  2. That's so frustrating! John Legend is AMAZING though, I'm super jealous!

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  3. That sucks. You'd think they would expect people that buy tickets together would want to be together during the concert. On the bright side you got tickets :)

    Maybe you could call or write a letter to the venue to see if your friends can be with you? Sometimes all it takes is to ask.

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  4. That does not seem fair, I get what you mean wanting to share this experience with friends but John Legend is amazing anyway :)

    floralconstellation.com

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  5. for what it's worth, I share your frustration. Most sporting venues separate me from my family, which takes away half the fun. http://shaneclifton.com/2014/06/22/nigel-no-friends/

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  6. A great post I really don't understand who makes these rubbish rules up. If you are disabled you are not allowed more that four friend to go to a concert to sit next to you, no they have to sit in an entirely different row. When are we going to get with the twenty first century. Seeing John Legend will be amazing live. Lucy

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  7. thats awful. I would of thought you could at least have a carer with you. What if theres a problem and your carer can't here you from where shes sitting.
    I hope you have a lovely time regardless of the annoying seat problem x

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